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A Journey through the book of Genesiswith Willow Creek Community Church

Read Genesis

Week 5/Day 2: Pledging Allegiance

Willow Creek Community Church

So Jacob said to his household and to all who were with him, “Get rid of the foreign gods you have with you, and purify yourselves and change your clothes.”

~ Genesis 35:2

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Earlier, in Genesis 28, while Jacob was fleeing to the city of Harran, he made a vow to God. “If God will be with me and will watch over me on this journey I am taking . . . then the Lord will be my God.” This vow was a pledge of allegiance to the Lord, the God of Israel. Jacob promised that if God would be faithful to him, then he would give his full allegiance to the Lord. This might seem like an odd vow for Jacob to make. Was the Lord not already his God? What other god might have competed for Jacob’s allegiance? 

Understanding the religious background of Jacob’s extended family in Harran sheds light on the importance of Jacob’s pledge. The names of Jacob’s ancestors and the places where his ancestors lived make it clear that Jacob came from a family of moon worshippers. Terah, Jacob’s great-grandfather, was named after the moon, which in Hebrew is yareah. Laban, Jacob’s uncle, has a name that sounds like the Hebrew word for full moon, Lebanah. Moreover, Harran and Ur, two of the cities where Abram lived were major centers of moon worship. This and further evidence suggests that moon worship was a part of Jacob’s family history. 

This background information can help us appreciate the significance of the vow that Jacob made to God. Jacob wanted God to know that if He would watch over Jacob while he was in Harran, then Jacob would not turn back to his old family gods. 

In Genesis 35, Jacob effectively fulfills his vow to God by commanding all those with him to “rid” themselves of their “foreign gods” (Genesis 35:2). God had proven to be faithful by being “with him” wherever he went (Genesis 35:3), now it was Jacob’s turn to give his full allegiance to God. While we may not struggle with the idea of foreign gods, we may still have a hard time giving God our full allegiance. We prioritize things over God, such as our work or our possessions because these are things that give us feelings of power and security. Jacob’s instruction applies to us as well. What do we need to change in our lives to ensure that God has our full allegiance?


Genesis 34–35

34

Dinah and the Shechemites

1 Now Dinah, the daughter Leah had borne to Jacob, went out to visit the women of the land. 2 When Shechem son of Hamor the Hivite, the ruler of that area, saw her, he took her and raped her. 3 His heart was drawn to Dinah daughter of Jacob; he loved the young woman and spoke tenderly to her. 4 And Shechem said to his father Hamor, “Get me this girl as my wife.”

5 When Jacob heard that his daughter Dinah had been defiled, his sons were in the fields with his livestock; so he did nothing about it until they came home.

6 Then Shechem’s father Hamor went out to talk with Jacob. 7 Meanwhile, Jacob’s sons had come in from the fields as soon as they heard what had happened. They were shocked and furious, because Shechem had done an outrageous thing in Israel by sleeping with Jacob’s daughter —  thing that should not be done.

8 But Hamor said to them, “My son Shechem has his heart set on your daughter. Please give her to him as his wife. 9 Intermarry with us; give us your daughters and take our daughters for yourselves. 10 You can settle among us; the land is open to you. Live in it, trade in it, and acquire property in it.”

11 Then Shechem said to Dinah’s father and brothers, “Let me find favor in your eyes, and I will give you whatever you ask. 12 Make the price for the bride and the gift I am to bring as great as you like, and I’ll pay whatever you ask me. Only give me the young woman as my wife.”

13 Because their sister Dinah had been defiled, Jacob’s sons replied deceitfully as they spoke to Shechem and his father Hamor. 14 They said to them, “We can’t do such a thing; we can’t give our sister to a man who is not circumcised. That would be a disgrace to us. 15 We will enter into an agreement with you on one condition only: that you become like us by circumcising all your males. 16 Then we will give you our daughters and take your daughters for ourselves. We’ll settle among you and become one people with you. 17 But if you will not agree to be circumcised, we’ll take our sister and go.”

18 Their proposal seemed good to Hamor and his son Shechem. 19 The young man, who was the most honored of all his father’s family, lost no time in doing what they said, because he was delighted with Jacob’s daughter. 20 So Hamor and his son Shechem went to the gate of their city to speak to the men of their city. 21 “These men are friendly toward us,” they said. “Let them live in our land and trade in it; the land has plenty of room for them. We can marry their daughters and they can marry ours. 22 But the men will agree to live with us as one people only on the condition that our males be circumcised, as they themselves are. 23 Won’t their livestock, their property and all their other animals become ours? So let us agree to their terms, and they will settle among us.”

24 All the men who went out of the city gate agreed with Hamor and his son Shechem, and every male in the city was circumcised.

25 Three days later, while all of them were still in pain, two of Jacob’s sons, Simeon and Levi, Dinah’s brothers, took their swords and attacked the unsuspecting city, killing every male. 26 They put Hamor and his son Shechem to the sword and took Dinah from Shechem’s house and left. 27 The sons of Jacob came upon the dead bodies and looted the city where their sister had been defiled. 28 They seized their flocks and herds and donkeys and everything else of theirs in the city and out in the fields. 29 They carried off all their wealth and all their women and children, taking as plunder everything in the houses.

30 Then Jacob said to Simeon and Levi, “You have brought trouble on me by making me obnoxious to the Canaanites and Perizzites, the people living in this land. We are few in number, and if they join forces against me and attack me, I and my household will be destroyed.”

31 But they replied, “Should he have treated our sister like a prostitute?”

35

Jacob Returns to Bethel

1 Then God said to Jacob, “Go up to Bethel and settle there, and build an altar there to God, who appeared to you when you were fleeing from your brother Esau.”

2 So Jacob said to his household and to all who were with him, “Get rid of the foreign gods you have with you, and purify yourselves and change your clothes. 3 Then come, let us go up to Bethel, where I will build an altar to God, who answered me in the day of my distress and who has been with me wherever I have gone.” 4 So they gave Jacob all the foreign gods they had and the rings in their ears, and Jacob buried them under the oak at Shechem. 5 Then they set out, and the terror of God fell on the towns all around them so that no one pursued them.

6 Jacob and all the people with him came to Luz (that is, Bethel) in the land of Canaan. 7 There he built an altar, and he called the place El Bethel, because it was there that God revealed himself to him when he was fleeing from his brother.

8 Now Deborah, Rebekah’s nurse, died and was buried under the oak outside Bethel. So it was named Allon Bakuth.

9 After Jacob returned from Paddan Aram, God appeared to him again and blessed him. 10 God said to him, “Your name is Jacob, but you will no longer be called Jacob; your name will be Israel.” So he named him Israel.

11 And God said to him, “I am God Almighty; be fruitful and increase in number. A nation and a community of nations will come from you, and kings will be among your descendants. 12 The land I gave to Abraham and Isaac I also give to you, and I will give this land to your descendants after you.” 13 Then God went up from him at the place where he had talked with him.

14 Jacob set up a stone pillar at the place where God had talked with him, and he poured out a drink offering on it; he also poured oil on it. 15 Jacob called the place where God had talked with him Bethel.

The Deaths of Rachel and Isaac

16 Then they moved on from Bethel. While they were still some distance from Ephrath, Rachel began to give birth and had great difficulty. 17 And as she was having great difficulty in childbirth, the midwife said to her, “Don’t despair, for you have another son.” 18 As she breathed her last — or she was dying — he named her son Ben-Oni. But his father named him Benjamin.

19 So Rachel died and was buried on the way to Ephrath (that is, Bethlehem). 20 Over her tomb Jacob set up a pillar, and to this day that pillar marks Rachel’s tomb.

21 Israel moved on again and pitched his tent beyond Migdal Eder. 22 While Israel was living in that region, Reuben went in and slept with his father’s concubine Bilhah, and Israel heard of it.

 

Jacob had twelve sons:

23 The sons of Leah:

Reuben the firstborn of Jacob,

Simeon, Levi, Judah, Issachar and Zebulun.

24 The sons of Rachel:

Joseph and Benjamin.

25 The sons of Rachel’s servant Bilhah:

Dan and Naphtali.

26 The sons of Leah’s servant Zilpah:

Gad and Asher.

These were the sons of Jacob, who were born to him in Paddan Aram.

 

27 Jacob came home to his father Isaac in Mamre, near Kiriath Arba (that is, Hebron), where Abraham and Isaac had stayed. 28 Isaac lived a hundred and eighty years. 29 Then he breathed his last and died and was gathered to his people, old and full of years. And his sons Esau and Jacob buried him.


Exploring the Text

1. In Genesis 35:11-12, God renews His promise to Jacob with a blessing. Who else has received this same blessing? What is the significance of this blessing to Jacob?

Reflection Question

2. The horrific account of Dinah left her brothers demanding justice. They allowed their anger to cloud their judgment and, in the end, made a terrible mistake. We are inundated with injustice all around us in today’s world. What injustice do you see that breaks your heart? How have you seen the pursuit of justice take a turn for the worst, like with Dinah’s brothers? What can you do today that would honor God and seek to heal a broken world?

3. Pledging allegiance to God means that we acknowledge the evil temptations in our life and vow to remain faithful to God’s commands. When we pledge our allegiance to God, we commit to worshiping Him even in trial and tribulation. What does it mean for you personally to pledge allegiance to God? How does this impact your decisions and your actions? When have you worshiped God in the middle of a trial?